When the air smell likes ice

Following on from my self-set challenge, here is the third in a series of seasonal flash-fiction. Again, I’m not going to tell what the season is, but I really hope that you can guess.

I love it when the air smells like ice. Dark green pine sways between barren branches and then mountains rise behind. Cars crunch salt, engines purring. It’s an experience, negotiating ice in six-inch heels; challenge accepted.  Coffee cup clutched tight to my chest. The bitter taste of rising steam is mellowed with double cream. Hat pulled low on burning ears and sunglasses paint the sky in gentler hues; lines of pink and gold across frozen blue. There’s another flurry on the horizon. Feet slip without warning. The ground is harder than it looks and less forgiving. Must buy boots.

Part One and Two can be found respectively.

Once part four is thrown up here then I’ll compile them together into a post. I’ll probably even tell you what seasons I was originally aiming for. Fingers-crossed that I’ve managed to avoid my natural inclination to the abstract. I have a tendency to think flash-fiction and then jump across to poetry. So you may have noticed some rhymes sneaking in.  The only problem is, that my abstract is often too abstract for most people to make any sense of it.  So what I’ve been learning is to write simply. Or rather…more simply. If I have an image in mind then just say what I see without trying (and usually failing) to be clever.

A prize for everyone!

A timely response to today’s prompt Champion

When you’ve been working on a project for so long, you can be accused of developing tunnel vision. Your project is a culmination of coffee, late nights, long hours staring at a blank page, longer hours editing the same words over and over, more coffee… you get the picture. You dream of releasing it out into the world and watching it fly…and then comes all the waiting.

So I decided that I needed to write something new, something fresh – and I’m so glad that I did.

I’ve returned to the wonderful lists of Christopher Fielden and I picked out a few competitions. I’m not much of a poet (and doesn’t everyone know it – ba dum tish) but I’ve had reasonable success with flash-fiction. Something short, something snappy I thought? I can do flash-fiction!

So I submitted a piece to Christopher’s Writing Challenges. The gratification of knowing I’d done something of a good deed – submitting fiction to raise money for charity, was only seconded by the happy glow of seeing my work published on someone’s website. Wheee!

So I submitted to Third-Word as well!

I won!

I am so excited you would not believe, I’m even using far too many explanation marks!!!

Alongside a nifty prize, I still get that lovely glow of  achievement and I’m delighted that again, the Eighty-One words will be put to a good cause. Third word are going to compile an anthology to help homelessness. Triple win!

It’s been an exciting few weeks and I’ve set Burning Embers decidedly to one side, for now. I’m even working on a new Novel – tentatively titled: Initiate

Oooo…I hear you say.

More details will be forthcoming in other posts.

Slim Grip on Reality

In response to the Daily Prompt: Cling

Rough seas rise up, dark and murky. Toes stretching in a frantic search for solid ground and arms flail for the coarse grip of rope.

The submissions are sent and my author-neurotic self is running circles, yelping oh my god, oh my god what if no one wants it! What if it’s not worthy, what if I’m not worthy?! Years of hard work and effort wasted? What will I say? How will I explain that I have failed? Once I’ve found a moment to breathe I remind myself that if traditional publishing is not my route, then the world won’t end. In the words of Obama, the sun will continue to rise. In the words of myself, of the things that are certain in this world, it’s that there is always change. Sometimes it just seems to take longer to get arrive. (Sometimes it feels like change got on the wrong bus and is now on a circular route and stuck in M25 traffic, but hey – it’ll get here.)

My journey as a writer will continue. Having simply finished the manuscript and sent it out, I feel rejuvenated (and then terrified) but mostly rejuvenated to start new projects; exciting projects! The second book in the series, a selection of short pieces for radio, a collaborative novella with an intended publisher in mind! Exciting, exciting, exciting!

Burning Embers will also, one way or another, live on. I believe that as Young Adult Fantasy is has a current market. As a genre it’s a saturated market, but I have to believe that I’ve got a unique voice to offer and a story that my readers will fall in love with, a world they won’t want to leave and characters that they’re desperate to champion. That is after all, the dream.

So, in the moments after the panic and in between the project planning, I look at self-publishing options. This blog was always supposed to explore the traditional and the non-traditional and so today I’m going to share a few things that I’ve recently learnt about self-publishing options.

  1. The book needs an ISBN if I’m going to do this. It’s not strictly needed for e-book but I’m vain and prideful and I want to hold my book in my hands! If I want to sell a printed version, it needs an ISBN and then and ISBN printed barcode – this means it can be sold. Hooray
  2. I want the ISBN to be registered in my name. This means I retain the rights as the publisher as well as the Author – double win.
  3. I need to generate more of an online presence. Kew twitter feed, reviewing other peoples works, finding an audience of peer reviewers (how do I find you lovely people?) Beta testers! I need to create a circle of people who are going to be just as excited about the book as I am. To be honest – this works in both versions. If there’s an agent or a publishing contract out there for Burning Embers, then building this circle up is still going to be important.
  4. I would like Burning Embers to be available as an ebook, and in print. I’d like it on Amazon and I’d also like it with Neilson and Gardeners, so that this way the big chain stores have a chance in stocking it. You have to fill out a lot of appropriate paperwork and there is still no guarantee, but if the book is not with a wholesaler/distributer – it’s not going to happen.
  5. I would really like someone to do a lot of the hard work for me. You have to send five copies of your printed book out to specific libraries here in the UK so that it’s legally listed. It’s something I’m capable of doing but right now my brain hurts.
  6. I would also like someone to make the copy-set pretty. This is also beyond my skill.
  7. Could they make the cover too?

So this is what I’m looking for, and I don’t have an enormous budget. My list of demands are the above plus 100 copies of the book. A press release, merchandise and other things I think I can probably do. I’ve even worked out how to get a paypal button on here, wordpress, so that I could sell and distribute the book myself. I’m doing a lot of research and maybe I’ll never need to use it. Perhaps though, I will.

If you’re considering self-publishing, do all of the reading. The pages and pages of PDF’s offered on the company websites. Compare them for the services they offer and the rights that you retain. If you get 100% royalties, that’s awesome, but do you own the ISBN?

It might be construed that I am procrastinating as I wait for replies to return to my inbox. I know myself though, I need to keep my mind busy. Research into a positive outcome is currently my life line and I’m going to hold on dreaming, for as long as I can.

If you have any advice of finding that circle of reviewers, I’d love to hear it!

 

Distractions, Distractions, Distractions – No More!

The manuscript is done! The Christmas Holidays gave me a good opportunity to finish the final edit. It has been a lengthy process and would have been quicker with so few distractions. The majority of last year was spent writing short stories on writing forums. With so much history with Burning Embers, I couldn’t face returning to it.

Was the time wasted? No, I don’t think so. Most of it was spent feeling very guilty about my neglected manuscript. The printed papers were moved from desk, to drawer, to desk and then at what I consider to be the lowest ebb – stuffed in a bookshelf. The guilt though, the writing guilt is gone. Writing on forums I was able to rediscover the sheer joy of putting prose to paper and working to captivate an audience. I’ve developed some new characters and their voices are strong and their stories are interesting. I’ve enjoyed playing with technique, expanding dialogue and exploring a new world with other writers and I’m confident in the impact it has made in my writing. I worry that some of the rules on structure, grammar and style have slipped out of my ears but I can tweak those more easily than I can learn to write a sense of place and expand emotion. I’m proud of the thousands of words I’ve churned out in the last year, even if they’re not on my blog and won’t make it to print. I’m excited to work with writing partners in the future, with a few collaborative projects in development.

Back to the manuscript – you see how easy it is to be side tracked?

In my mind, it was an insurmountable task. 310 pages of printed 1.5 spaced A4 text. 110,000 words to be carefully cultivated and on occasion, brutally hacked with a machete, (there’s shredded paper everywhere) The edit has been my Everest, my Mount Doom and now it is done. I feel like I’ve shaken off a huge weight around my ankles and I’m floating around. This isn’t namby-pamby floating though. After the colossal final edit was done, I went through with a few additional culls. The filler word culprits this time were: but, though and so. Cut them! Cut them all!

Once the post-edit euphoria has faded I’m sure I’ll come down from my excitement. It is difficult though, as I’ve started submitting to agents and indie publishers who accept Young Adult, or New Adult Fantasy. A whole new genre appeared whilst I’ve been writing my book, who knew?! (Apparently not me, as I’ve had my head in a computer for a year)

I might be back to where I began with this blog a few years ago, but I’m better for it and I am excited for the future.

Scratches on the Surface

In my foolish endeavor to return to my prolific blogging self I’ll be joining in with the Daily Prompt ‘s once more. Hooray!

I’ve been caught up with the Olympics again. I feel like a fool, because when the medals are presented I lose that sense of proprietary and the tears start building.  Athletes that realize that they’ve won a medal seem to have the same struggle. Hit with emotion that they struggle to contain. Euphoria, excitement, tears and weak-knees all break through to the surface, for all the world to see. There’s something vulnerable in those moments and sometimes I wish the camera would turn away, and let them regain their sense of control.

But I’m afraid that what gets to me, is that this moment is their culmination of years of sacrifice and training. The metallic disc is their representation of teenage years spent in a swimming pool or gym. Time away from friends and family, early starts and late nights. In their moments of triumph, I can’t help but feel that the absolute joy is made all the sweeter by the difficulties and the long journeys to this point.

In the stories I like to write and love to read, I’m propelled through the plot twists because I’m seeking that moment of triumph. If the protagonist is not victorious then I can’t help by feel cheated. But what is that moment worth, is if the journey is too easy? Nothing can be gained at the end if nothing was ever at risk of being lost.

At the close of a novel, and perhaps shorter fiction, and certainly in a lot of films there is usually that moment of ‘all hope is lost.’ There’s a metaphorical death of the protagonists’ purpose. If they set out seeking love, then the object of their affection might have made it absolutely clear there is no future. Without this moment of utter failure to meet their purpose there wouldn’t be the sweet sense of victory when it’s achieved and they run off into the happily ever after.

So for anyone who is editing, or coming to the end of a piece. Where is your moment of utter failure? Where are the scratches on the medal?

A New Challenge – Guest Post! BubblingWIP

This week I thought I would take on a new challenge with my blog and introduce a guest blogger. Please extend a warm welcome to Sawyer of Bubblingwip.com!

A few weeks (or months) ago, I received a lovely comment from a follower and was touched by their encouragement. It was a moment and I followed them to their own corner of the web and found Bubbling WIP. But how is this all relevant you ask?

Well, I think it’s safe to say that I’ve been struggling to find the time and commitment to blog here. (Sad times) In the past few weeks I’ve also lost the time to write, but I’ll get it back – I’ll start going through my own rules of how to get back into writing and gosh darn it, I’ll be flying again!

Anyway, inspiration struck at Bubblingwip. I liked the blog, I liked the writer and their philosophy. So I reached out to try something new. Hello, I said. Would you like to do a guest post?  (Having never done this before, or really know how to do it…) Luckily for me Sawyer said yes please and was happy for me to bimble through the hows and the what and work things out.

I do have to make an apology though – I’ve become that person I find frustrating. I’ve been sitting on Sawyer’s carefully crafted answers for too long because the month just ran away with me. However, I am really excited to give you this guest post and hope that I can be forgiven for my extreme slowness.  Having a guest post was a challenge and one I’d be willing to take up again.

So, without further rambling and ado – over to Sawyer of BubblingWip.com

  1. What inspired your current bubbling work in progress?

Well, I started painting years ago, teaching myself how to use the different brushes and mix the paint. Because I have never had a formal education in art, my work was shut out of some places without ever being looked at. The same is true with my writing. It can be intimidating to see other writers’ long list of literary achievements to go along with their literary degrees. So my intention was to create a space for both writers and artists to share their work and ideas, no degree required. I am also getting close to wrapping up my manuscript, so I wanted to use this blog as a platform to share my progress as I go along. Hopefully, what I am learning may help other writers who are trying to achieve the same thing.

  1. Since starting out on your writer’s journey, what are the top three things you have learnt?

1) The importance of an outline! When beginning my book, the outline was essential for me to map out how I needed to get started while still staying on course during the drafting process.

2) I’ve learned that sometimes rules are made to be broken. This applies to grammar rules. I refuse to use a semicolon in my writing. Trust a fragment sentence sometimes. Writing is supposed to flow with the rhythm of speech and thought, both of which are fragmented at times.

3) The last tip without a doubt would be the importance of finding good readers to work with. I have been blessed to have found some outstanding readers-not family- who have committed their time and energy into reviewing my work. Because of their insightful tips and sharp eyes on catching my mistakes, my manuscript has been able to develop and transform into it’s full potential.

  1. What is the one piece of advice you wish you’d had when you first started?

Get to researching! I have been writing for years, but it was always for my own pleasure. When I finally decided I wanted to get published, I had no clue where to begin. Honestly, I think that actually finishing up my manuscript was less daunting than gathering all the information I needed to publish traditionally.

  1. What is your opinion on the traditional publishing route vs self-publishing?

I love that self-publishing has become so popular. With sites like Kindle, Amazon, and Smashwords, it has really opened doors for independent writers to get their work out there. Even the writers who want to publish without waiting however many years it could take to find an agent to help get their work published traditionally. I considered self-publishing, but after giving it a lot of thought, I would rather be patient, bide my time, and cross my fingers that I can find an agent to work with.

  1. What do you imagine your next project will be about?’

The outline for my next project is already in the works. I am planning a second part to my book, Mellie: Vinyl and Candy. I knew when I finished up the last chapter that my main character had more to tell. Her story is not yet finished.

Thank you so much for your contribution. I’m more than a bit envious that you’re working on something new! I keep being tempted to step aside but I must finish the current project. Maybe then I can start to re-explore something new, maybe a different genre or form? I’m very tempted by radio plays and short stories at the moment. They just seem easier to close down and finish.

Thank you again – lets here it for the wonderful Bubblingwip!

Fibi

I wonder…

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Helpless.

Helpless? Maybe more excited and confused. Definitely confused. Decisions are difficult to make.

In the wee hours of this morning I stumbled across a writing competition with an ultimate prize of publication. Hooray! The competition is with Nerdist and runs on the premise of your book being crowdfunded.

Say what? Take two?

Now I thought I was fairly internet savvy but today has been the day I learnt about crowd funded publishing. I have to admit, I’m very excited!

I spent the wee hours researching like a demon and this is what I have found. Inkshares, a US based company. You submit an idea, a draft and if you reach enough pre-orders (1000) they publish you book and it’s released out into the big wide world. It seems to have the benefit of traditional publishing too. Amazing.

In the UK there is Unbound.  A very similar model of funding with UK distribution.  However with Inkshare you retain your rights, with Unbound you don’t. I have to admit, as much as I feel lured by the promise of UK distribution, I feel a bit frightened by the prospect of having to be in a film to promote the crowd funding; eeek!

US…UK…US…UK….

Or do I hold out? This is so tempting because I am SO CLOSE to finishing the manuscript. I feel as though I’ve been celebrating the writing of the; ‘last ten chapters’ for weeks. And I’ve been behaving. I’ve been a good writer, very well behaved and dedicated. Every week I’ve signed of a chapter and plunged forward in the story. It’s so close now, I can almost taste it. I need to will to resist crowd funding for just a couple more months. Then I’ll be sending my manuscript out to agents.

There’s more information comparing the different types of crowd funding here and apparently this place is pretty nifty for long term funding here. I found them very interesting articles. I’m still fighting off the lure. Oooh and another place… Publishizer…  but then do I have to work out how to put it into print as well? Or does Publishizer do that for me? Does anyone know?

Just wondering, dreaming… could I reach 1000 pre-orders? Testing the waters here, would you want my book?

Note: Mum, you can’t just say yes 1000 times.

Extra note: Hana, you can’t either!