Cover Revelations! The Poisoned Well

So, this has been promised and now it is here!Time to give myself a Reprieve from deadlines and celebrate. The cover for The Poisoned Well is ready to be unveiled. I just hope you like it, I’m so excited to share it!

The Poisoned Well is a YA Fantasy with strong romantic elements. It’s also story which features the Myst, a collective of magic users and one of their students, Lyris.

In creating the design, I wanted to keep the cover as simple as possible and I love how sharp it is with a simple image on the background. The gorgeous border is thanks to Daniella, as I was about to start pulling my hair out. There were a few lovely variations created, and even a sneaky preview of fan-art if you noticed it a few weeks ago.

PoisonedWell

I’m literally bouncing with excitement and I can’t wait to keep working on this project and get it ready for you to read!

What I would really love, is the chance to give the book away for review. If anyone is interested in a pre-release copy to review then please drop me an e-mail at fibijeeves@gmail.com or drop me a comment, or message on Facebook! 

Happy Writing

Fibi xxx

Novel Writing – Starting Somewhere

Writing a longer piece of fiction can feel like setting off on an unchartered ocean. I’ve hopefully compiled a few ideas to stop you feeling Adrift

So, you want to write a story? Not just any story, but the book you feel you’ve wanted to write for years? I would like to say I only have one piece of advice, but then this blog and series of posts with helpful hints and ideas would be arbitrary. So, this is perhaps the most important thing to piece of information. You can do it! What are you doing reading this blog, go write! – Wait, please don’t go! I have advice!

If you are writing an extended story, a novel, an epic ten-part series, or even a novella, you will probably recognise the push and pull of the paragraph above. If not, you’ll soon get used to it. From writing novels, or attempting to, I’ve found that I develop a love/hate relationship with the projects I’m undertaking. On the one hand, they’re just so darned exciting! On the other…when will it end?! Will all the effort even be worth it? What if no one likes it, what if no one except your mum ever reads it? What if you cannot be the next JK Rowling? Despair! Then fall back in love with the words, the story, your characters and the setting again and it’s the worst relationship ever.

This is going to be a series of blog posts about writing that book, or novel. It’s going to cover topics such as getting started, planning, characterisation, world building, editing and include writing prompts and a whole host of goodies. I hope you’ll join me for the ride and perhaps I can even provide something that will be helpful.

Now, I’ve written out a plan about planning – ironic. Yet, what I’m going to base this first post on, is Getting Started.

Now, before you open the cans labelled, ‘self-doubt’ and ‘crushing despair’ that I think writers tend to carry; as with any good relationship, it may be time to set some boundaries with your writing project.

Now, this isn’t, in any way, supposed to limit the scope of your project, and there will be a long discussion about ‘too much planning’ in my next post on this theme. However, I’ve learnt to set myself a few goals when it comes to approaching a new project. If you’re about to launch into yours, (or maybe you’ve already started?) are you able to answer the following questions?

  1. Who is your intended audience?

Child or Adult fiction? Young Adult or New Adult? Steam-punk lovers, or die hard sword and sorcery epic fantasy fans?

  1. What size project are you aiming for?

Is this going to be a gorgeous and concise piece of prose and a short story? What about a poem? Or does it need more space to breathe and could thrive as a novella (under 50,000 words -ish) or is it going to be a full- blown novel? If you’re thinking about publication, then as a rough guide for a debut novelist, you might want to aim for less than 90,000 words. Although, this doesn’t apply to all genres.

  1. If no one other than your mum reads it, is that okay?

Writing to complete a project takes a lot of investment. The most important thing that any of us has, is our time. If you’re going to invest several months of your time on this beautiful planet, hacking away at your keyboard, and wondering where the letter ‘N’ vanished off to (seriously, where has it gone?!) Then are you going to be alright if it isn’t a storming success?

There are a few lessons that I remember very clearly from creative writing courses and one of them is this. Write what you would love to read. This is probably going to dictate who your audience is as well. I love reading YA Fantasy, historical romance, sword and sorcery, old-fashioned crime fiction and children’s literature. What I end up writing is a strange mixture of those components.

At the end of the day, if I’m going to be living in the world I’m writing, it must be enticing – for me at least. Even if not for anyone else. There will be enough days when I don’t want to open the project document and get to work, so I aim to make the project as interesting as possible for myself. When you love something, it’s easier to be passionate about it and keep slugging away. It’s also easier for others to become excited about your enthusiasm and volunteer their own time to read your story.

If you’ve followed the rule of ‘write what you’d want to read’ and you’re pleased with the result; the chances are that you’ve created something where others can share your excitement.

  1. What is the question?

Stories need a question and they need it fast. Your reader will skim the first lines and decide if they’re going to follow you on this journey. To entice them down the rabbit hole, they need an initial question. Now, many stories will diverge brilliantly from the path I’ll set out now, but the way I approach a new project, is to work out the first question.

The first hurdle is the first paragraph. Why should they bother getting to the end? Therefore, it needs to be something intriguing enough to propel the reader into the first page. Then the first page pushes them into the first chapter… and we’ll get to chapter breakdowns in another post.

Now for some examples:

There was once, in the country of Alifbay, a sad city, the saddest of cities, a city so ruinously sad that it had forgotten its name. – Salman Rushdie, Haroun and the Sea of Stories

Isn’t that incredible?! This is the opening from Haroun and the Sea of Stories, which by the way, is a wonderful story. The first line! Now look at the questions we’re forced to ask. 1, what is a sad city? 2, what is the name of the city? 3, will the city find happiness? There are three immediate questions in 26 words and they’re enough to tempt me on…

The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.  – Stephen King, The Gunslinger

Four questions in the opening twelve words. 1, who is the man in black? 2, who is the gunslinger? 3, will the gunslinger catch the man in black? 4, Do I want that to happen? Eeeek, I don’t know so I better keep reading!

  1. Don’t worry

Now I’ve raised all the talk about questions, I’m going to tell you step aside from any worry it’s created. The sudden surge of ‘am I asking a question in the first line? Is this a good enough question? What is a question?!’ Because this is just the beginning and the most important thing, is to just get writing. Make your start, aim for a question and forge ahead. After all, you’ve got forever to edit and to bring that opening sequence up to what you want it to be – but what you cannot do, is edit a blank screen.

I hope that this has been useful!  Let me know your favourite openings to novels, or even what you’re working on. I might even share the current opening of The Poisoned Well… I was so pleased that I managed to find a question that could carry the rest of the story along with it.

Happy Writing

Fibi

Daily Prompt: Drawing a Blank – Play your own game

Daily Prompt: When was the last time your walked away from a discussion, only to think of The Perfect Comeback hours later? Recreate the scene for us, and use your winning line.

We don’t argue, I just tell him when he’s wrong. – This was a brilliant quote from around the family table at the weekend. We all, at one point or another have sworn blind that we are the original inspiration for the television series, My Family – Susan, the ‘Mother’ really can’t cook, the siblings offer up the youngest as an offering to try experiment dishes, as he’ll react faster to any adverse effects. This is very familiar; and people wonder why my youngest brother is a fussy eater…

My actual family, not the series now, is fairly combustible at the best of times, and so this was a fitting representation.  After all, we’re all right, all the time…

Enough of my familial ramblings though, when did I last walk away from a discussion only to think of the perfect response later? I have to admit it’s been a while, I work in a fast-paced, fairly high-pressured role and I have to keep my wit as well as my wits about me.  To have walked away, and still be going over a discussion, also implies that you’d felt upset at the resolution – and frustration that you cannot say or do something can lead to severe unhappiness. Currently, and friends may explode into laughter at this point, I feel content, zen-like even. I am a temple of tranquility – except when I’ve eaten too much sugar and I can’t sit still.

The comeback:

I’ve always thought that ‘Pinch Punch, first of the Month’ as a stupid idea. Mainly because I had an unhappy time at school and didn’t relish the opportunity that it gave other students on a monthly basis. What I should have done, was approach them first and performed the ritual, before they got to me. But being the shy sort I never did. This caused a slight ball of rage. Poor Rob.

We were sat on the 1st of March, on the sofa, watching something innocuous on the television. He lent over and went “pinch, punch, first of the month” (Albeit, without any intention to cause discomfort on my part). I waited for three seconds, turned and punched him in the arm.

“I play my own game” I informed him.

I returned to watching the television. Rob roared with laughter, and I couldn’t help but join in.

I have since explained my aversion to the poor man, but from that point he has happily reminded me that ‘I play my own game’ at any appropriate opportunity. And I do, I irrevocably play my own game, sing to my own song sheet and dance to the tune that only I can hear.

It has been years since the pinch punch thing actually upset me, and the whole scene was actually just hilarious, to the pair of us at least. But don’t get caught up in rituals that you find pathetic and demeaning.  Play your own game.